Get trained to be a rare plant detective!

WI-DNR: Natural Heritage Conservation

Last year Rare Plant Monitoring Program volunteers rediscovered the state threatened white lady’s slipper orchid at a site where it had not been seen in over 45 years. Help us make more amazing discoveries this year by participating in the Rare Plant Monitoring Program.

Required trainings are scheduled for March and April. Sign up for one of our sessions in Waunakee, Stevens Point, Menomonie or Sheboygan. Plant identification will not be taught so some skill is required.

Volunteers’ observations and reports on the plants they see are critical to native plant conservation in Wisconsin. They alert land managers to pressing threats and inform on-the-ground management necessary to maintain these known populations. 

Learn how to sign up here.

USDA to Open Signup for Conservation Reserve Program

WASHINGTON, D.C., December 5, 2019 – Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced the U.S. Department of Agriculture is opening signup for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) on December 9, 2019. The deadline for agricultural producers to sign up for general CRP is
February 28, 2020, while signup for continuous CRP is ongoing.

Landowners who enroll in CRP receive a yearly rental payment for voluntarily establishing long-term, resource-conserving plant species, such as approved grasses or trees (known as “covers”) to control soil erosion, improve water quality and develop wildlife habitat on marginally productive agricultural lands.

By enrolling in CRP, producers are improving water quality, reducing soil erosion, and restoring habitat for wildlife. This in turn spurs hunting, fishing, recreation, tourism, and other economic development across rural America.

For more information, see the CRP Fact Sheet.

Stay current on news and events.

Don’t Miss Out On Important News from WWOA

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“The Kid in You”, reaching to our next generation of woodland owners

Author Bruce Grierson published an article called “The Kid in You” in Psychology Today, that sparked an interest with us at WWOA.  Grierson poses the question, “What if what we loved doing between ages 9 and 11, is what most of us ought to be doing for our actual jobs as adults?” Could you dig deep and recall what you were doing at age 10? Things that you were passionate about at that age? Grierson goes on to say that, “at age 10, kids graduate from being biologist, searching for a theory of life, to philosophers.”

Could this be a vital key to engaging some of our younger generation woodland owners?

To view the full article of “The Kid in You” click here.

Grierson also published a second part, “The Kid in You Part 2,” which can be found here.

 

State Plant Inspectors Advise Consumers to Properly Dispose of Holiday Greenery

Release Date: December 26, 2019

Media Contact: Brian Kuhn, Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, (608) 224-4590

High-resolution photo: Evergreen with EHS 

MADISON – The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) advises consumers who purchased evergreens this holiday season to check for an invasive pest called elongate hemlock scale (EHS) and properly dispose of any holiday greenery that may show signs of infestation. Plant health inspectors found EHS this year at multiple Wisconsin retailers who imported and sold the evergreens that came from other states.

“You can leave decorations up for the holidays, but we want to make sure consumers are disposing of infested evergreens properly to prevent this pest from establishing itself in Wisconsin,” said Brian Kuhn, Director of DATCP’s Bureau of Plant Industry. “If you know your evergreen did not come from Wisconsin, or it is showing signs of EHS, make sure you dispose of it properly. Proper disposal protects our state’s forests and Christmas tree producers from EHS.” [Read more…]

USDA Invites Input on Environmental Quality Incentives Program Rule

Contact:
FPAC.BC.Press@usda.gov

 

WASHINGTON, D.C., December 16, 2019 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) seeks public comments on its interim rule for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), USDA’s flagship program that helps producers plan and implement 150-plus conservation practices on working lands. The rule – now available on the Federal Register – takes effect upon publication and includes changes to the program prescribed by the 2018 Farm Bill.

“The Environmental Quality Incentives Program gives farmers, ranchers and forest landowners the tools they need to improve their agricultural operations while conserving natural resources,” NRCS Chief Matthew Lohr said. “The 2018 Farm Bill further strengthens this popular conservation program to enable NRCS to better support locally led conservation efforts while also expanding producers’ ability to address significant resource concerns.”

NRCS will make available $1.2 billion for interested producers in fiscal 2020. NRCS state offices will announce signup periods for EQIP in the coming weeks. 

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